Newsletter Story

By | 08.11.2019

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Pinterest Employee newsletters send through email are a golden opportunity to get everyone in your organization on the same page. Combining important updates with motivational bits of company culture, the best employee newsletters communicate pertinent information in a digestible way. Enticing employees to read through to the end — or even open the email in the first place — is easier said than done. Here are a few tips for making an employee newsletter they actually look forward to. Keep Newsletters Concise The wordier your email, the less likely your employees with a full workload will have time to digest the information.
Newsletter story

How to Make the Best Employee Newsletter to Catch Your Team’s Attention

More Sharing Options Tips for making your newsletter a must-read Your newsletter is your Number One vehicle for keeping your donors engaged in your work and eager to write checks to support it. It should cover recent successes and create enthusiasm for upcoming events or programs. Above all, its arrival should be eagerly anticipated and reading it should make your readers feel pride of accomplishment.

You know you’ve got it right when your readers start conversations around town with “Did you see the last newsletter? Wasn’t that a great story? Make it a good read. If you’re not a writer, find someone who is. The stories you tell are important, but so is the way you tell them. Don’t be a downer. Most people don’t want to feel sad or guilty or helpless.

Reminding your donors constantly about the numbers of animals dying in shelters or dwelling on the sad situations you deal with every day will probably not send them to their checkbooks. What will? Upbeat stories about successes their generosity has made possible. This doesn’t mean you don’t acknowledge and educate readers about the problems you’re solving; it just means you focus on how each donor is an essential part of the solution.

Remember, everyone wants to be on a winning team. Less is more. Your donors are busy people. They won’t take the time to read a lot of small print. Focus on a few strong stories that best represent who you are and what you do. Keep each story to three or four juicy paragraphs, maximum, and include photos. Get the best graphic design you can afford.

For better or worse, your newsletter will reinforce your visual image. The level of professionalism in its design will reflect the level of professionalism in your organization. A good clean design is a must. You may be able to get a firm to do the work pro bono, or a talented designer just starting out may be willing to work for free to build up her portfolio. Ask around. You may have a willing designer among your volunteers.

Your local chamber of commerce has a directory of local businesses. Working with a local firm or designer can benefit you both. Ditto photography: Nothing does more to make your donors feel close to the action than good pictures – and nothing does more to bring your reader into your newsletter than a great cover shot.

Find a volunteer who knows how to take good photos, and take the time to document your work with quality pictures. The photo tips we provide in our websites and fundraising article also apply to photos for newsletters.

Say “thank you,” and “more, please” in every issue. This tells every newsletter recipient that your agency appreciates its donors. If the list of donors is long, thank them as a group instead of listing individual names, but thank them.

Include information about how to make donations. Some newsletters include a tear-off form at the bottom of a page sometimes with a reply envelope. You can do this, or you can simply provide the information about ways to donate in the body of the newsletter. You want to make it as easy as possible for someone who is inspired by your work to send you a donation.

Develop a Voice

No matter who you are, you have a story worth telling. Tell people the important things you do for others. Sharing your story will help people. Structure isn’t the way to create a great newsletter. Stories are. As human beings, we’re entranced by stories from an early age. Start with. The typical employee newsletter can be forgettable for internal One way to guarantee that the relevant recipients read each story is to write a.

Using Your Newsletter to Tell Your Story

More Sharing Options Tips for making your newsletter a must-read Your newsletter is your Number One vehicle for keeping your donors engaged in your work and eager to write checks to support it. It should cover recent successes and create enthusiasm for upcoming events or programs. Above all, its arrival should be eagerly anticipated and reading it should make your readers feel pride of accomplishment. You know you’ve got it right when your readers start conversations around town with “Did you see the last newsletter? Wasn’t that a great story?

Featured Tools & Tips

Musings offers monthly thoughts and ideas about the art of telling tales. In our modern media world, filled with preprogrammed imagery, storytelling offers the listener an opportunity to be creative; to design costumes, sets and scenery in the theatre of the mind.

HOWTO: Story Arts | Musings Newsletter

During the month of September, we’ll be doing a random draw each week and one lucky newsletter subscriber will get to submit their entry for. Welcome to the National Deaf Life Museum’s Newsletter Page! If you have any story ideas, feedback or any questions, please feel free to e-mail us at. Don’t miss the next big story. Brave investigations We’ve been telling stories that change laws and lives for more than 40 years. Sign up for our newsletter. 2 .

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